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COVID-19

To Jemma Woodman, journalist/presenter at BBC Spotlight SW.  Copies to DG etc

Dear Ms Woodman,

I do my best to avoid the BBC except for Monty and Countryfile, but sample the wall to wall propagandare nero occasionally - as tonight at 6.30 pm.  I find, unusually. that there is no I player link yet. Quote - at 9.35pm  via   https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000nffw

This programme will be available shortly (sic) after broadcast.   See link below.

Briefly - I was trained in medicine at St Mary's Paddington from 1958 to 1964, and have been learning, and teaching, ever since.  The scientific principles were at the fore in the home of penicillin, and the hospital had a strong focus on infection.  We were taught very well in bacteriology, virology, epidemiology, and especially immunology.  The later by an unusually good teacher - Professor Ken Porter. the son of a railwayman - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodney_Robert_Porter
Pathology was central in our teaching and I was 'good' at it.  Hence my continued interest in the 'unnatural' death of Dr David Kelly, a death uniquely never having been subject to an inquest - a sign of lawlessness in our dear country.

You unfortunately, along with many BBC commentators, including those on health, are not so well informed.  However, you saw fit to interview the Chief Constable in an unbalanced way.  It was almost an harangue.  You could see the strain on his face.  He is representing the Devon and Cornwall Police.  His force 'picks up the pieces', and that has to do with the lowest media standards.  You were citing several of many e-mails - in general demanding that the police should enforce 'The 2019/2020 Corona Virus Bill' - passed on the nod in just over 48 hours by a generally, morally bankrupt legislature.  And to apocalyptic societal and economic cost.  The BBC has amplified this C19 propaganda in every hour since.

cc to Director - Tony Hall - Baron Hall of Birkenhead. + Mel Stride MP

The BBC - motto  'Nation Shall Speak Peace unto Nation'

Dear Editor - BBC Spotlight - Seymour Road, Plymouth.  ( I have been to your studios on about 6 occasions - Dove and Dolphin - Palestine, Community Hospital closures by diktat- etc)

Some questions for you

ONE   The broadcast -  emphasis on 'outbreak' of C19 at Exeter University -

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m000mxdm/spotlight-evening-news-23092020

Intro - "There has been a big increase in corona virus cases in Cornwall and Exeter in the last week ....  ... now self-isolating"

This by Kevin Corbett RN whose address is on the video below. We must all be as fearless as as Senior Nurse Corbett. ‘A dark is falling over our still beautiful world’.

The organisation of it was fraught but we got there in the end. What a day!

I thought it best to wear my uniform [even though just retired] as people should see health professionals speaking out.

Thousands in Trafalgar Square [estimate 33k] and moving down Whitehall to Parliament Square.  Joyous sight to behold.

Special mention for Kate Shemirani the MC who is a RN and natural therapist suspended by the nursing regulator for speaking out. Without her skills of fluidly working the mic between speakers and all the hiccups it would've fallen flat.

The police tried to stop it at every point.

A good report from May Ayres, artist and sculptor in East London - 

I was at the mass protest on Saturday, a very moving and inspiring experience.

It was such a huge relief to be amongst real people with friendly, warm animated faces. No masks, no social distancing, wonderful conversations, the first time I’ve enjoyed a commonality with so many others for over six months!

I walked to Trafalgar Square, took me just over an hour and my first stop were the toilets in Charing Cross Station. I joined the long queue waiting  and what a pleasure to find most of those queuing were also on the way to the protest. The most enjoyable wait for a pee I’ve had! Lively discussions and a camaraderie that was food for the soul.

The square was already packed at 11.30am. The most diverse gathering of people I have witnessed since the massive  march against the invasion of Iraq in 2003.
Everyone incredibly friendly and an abundance of home made placards, a sure sign of the grassroots nature of the protest.

Yes, Kevin Corbet was a joy to listen to, as were all the other speakers.

There is no logic, nor reason based in medical science, for the wearing of paper or cloth masks in the context of the epidemic of this virus – Covid_19 (C19) .  The virus, though likely altered in laboratories, is part of a family of viruses/virions first identified in the 1960’s – the corona viruses. Corona = crown, and hence the projected images seen on every BBC ‘news’ for months.  It is often found, along with other classes of viruses, by chance – as in 15% of cases of the ‘common cold’.

I was a medical student at St Mary’s Hospital Paddington from 1958 to 1964.  Amongst all of the subjects in my education there was bacteriology, virology, epidemiology (the study of disease in populations at large eg cholera in Soho – Dr Snow 1854), and immunology.  The latter was taught very well by Professor Porter, who was later awarded a Nobel Prize, and his case deservedly! St Mary’s was the home of penicillin, Alexander Fleming having noted that a mould was killing colonies of bacteria on a culture plate.  The hospital was expert in infection, and its Almoth Wright Institute had been at the centre of this since the early twenties.  We were taught to use antibiotics wisely, and not wastefully nor dangerously.

As doctors, it is essential that we learn as much as possible about pathology in creatures, and especially the human.  This is the study of things that go wrong and sometimes cause disease.  Known in depth, and over time, this gives the doctor ‘X ray eyes’ when facing a sick person.  It was  taught very well at St Mary’s there being a ‘post-mortem’ demonstration at noon on every weekday.  These were presentations of the history, preserved organs and slides of the tissues in the woman or man who had died.  They took place in a lecture theatre and were given by the Professor in Pathology or one of several pathologists.  We also witnessed actual post-mortems/autopsies.  I absorbed all this, and gained a prize as a student in it.  I am very grateful for this teaching and to St Mary’s – a hospital that was a family – for caring.  I am sad, and angry also, to say that pathology has been sidelined, along with much else in OUR NHS.  I read that of all deaths IN hospital only between 1 to 2% are subject to a post-mortem.  It is known that at least 40% of diagnoses made on the ward are found to be wrong when the body and its tissues are studied in and after the post-mortem examination.